GNM (gnathological neuromuscular dentistry) Offering TMJ Treatment

I am excited to announce that I have completed training with Clayton Chan, DDS in GNM (gnathological neuromuscular dentistry).

I can provide treatment for jaw joint problems, TMJ dysfunction and associated symptoms, which includes popping and clicking on the jaw joint, painful the opening and closing of your mouth, certain types of a headache, clenching and grinding problems.

If you experience any of these problems, please contact us for an evaluation. This approach is reversible and it is much different than traditional methods of treatment.

Biomimetic Dentistry is now offered by Mansell Dentistry

We are happy to announce that we are now trained to provide minimally invasive Biomimetic dentistry. This approach to dental treatment is geared to preserving tooth structure using the most up-to-date materials which include reinforced mash fiber called Ribbond, along with the strongest bonding composite and components.

The new composite (white feelings) has a stronger chemical bond to the tooth, thus allowing that tooth to be flexible in function, along with sealing out biological contamination which causes dental decay or cavities.

This technique will help to eliminate the need for cutting down individual teeth for crowns. Research has demonstrated that this Biomimetic dental technique has a success rate of greater than 97% which will also eliminate the need for any further restorative treatment in the future.

Please contact us for more information regarding this new procedure. Let us help you preserve your teeth and smile.

Promising treatment for periodontitis gum regeneration

Researchers have designed a safer, faster and cheaper cell-based regenerative therapy approach for the treatment of one of the most common human dental diseases, namely periodontitis. A destructive and painful condition that is marked by inflammation and subsequent loss of the gums and the supporting structures of the teeth, periodontitis is caused by bacteria that trigger inflammation of the gums that surround teeth. The proposed therapy design promises to address periodontitis without the shortcomings and limitations of regenerative therapies to date. By safely and effectively addressing one of the most common human diseases in both a time- and cost- efficient manner, the novel therapy represents monumental advantages to public health.

Symptoms of periodontitis disease include inflammation of the gums that surround teeth, which creates infected pockets that not only cause bone erosion and tooth loss but are also associated with worse health outcomes such as heart diseases or even Alzheimer’s disease. Periodontitis is currently treated via therapies such as infection-fighting methods, molecules that promote , also known as growth factors, and  using autologous  (MSC), or a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells that belong to skeletal tissues such as cartilage, bone and fat. The ultimate goal of periodontal disease treatment is the reorganization of functional tissue that can regenerate the tissue that has been lost due to disease. However, the side effects of current regenerative treatments have been limited depending on age, systemic disease and tissue quality and as such have been associated with severe defects.

While periodontitis gum regeneration is still in development for our practice to use, come see Dr. Kathi Mansell, Scottsdale Dentist, for your regular cleaning and oral health check.

Credits: medicalxpress.com

New antibiotic may treat gum disease

A new antibiotic being developed at the University of Virginia School of Medicine appears ideal for battling periodontal disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, according to dental researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University led by Richard T. Marconi.

The drug, amixicile, was found to be effective against the harmful “Red Group” of  associated with advanced gum . Amixicile is already in development for treatment and prevention of antibiotic-associated colitis caused by Clostridium difficile, dangerous bacteria that can cause life-threatening infections.

The researchers say amixicile may have another important benefit, too. Because amixicile works differently than other antibiotics, it is thought that it would be extremely difficult for bacteria to find a way to become resistant to it. That means it could be used widely without contributing to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

“In the fight against antibiotic resistance, it is rare to find an antibiotic that breaks the rules – opening up the possibility for treating patients for life, just like statins [drugs used to lower cholesterol],” said researcher Paul Hoffman of UVA’s Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health. “Why is this important? Medical researchers know that inflammation caused by chronic anaerobic infections like  contributes to the onset of autoimmune disease – rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and even Alzheimer’s disease. Think about it: Like taking a daily-dose aspirin for prevention of heart disease, taking a pill a day for prevention of inflammation might just lower risks for these other diseases.”

Benefits for Gum Disease

While amixicile could have many applications, it appears to have several benefits specific to periodontal disease. The VCU researchers, working in the laboratory, found that amixicile was highly effective at inhibiting the growth of six different species of harmful Treponema spirochetes associated with gum disease. In addition, the drug was found to reduce expression of virulence traits that allow the bacteria to penetrate tissue and promote inflammation, key steps in establishing gum infections.

Research also suggests that amixicile will accumulate in inflamed gum areas where the pathogens are most concentrated, a feature which might spare beneficial bacteria in surrounding healthy gum tissue.

“We were very excited by the outcome of this study,” Marconi said. “The oral treponema associated with periodontal disease are a diverse group of bacteria. The ability of amixicile to effectively target these bacteria is a significant step forward that will provide a new and targeted treatment approach for periodontal disease. The need for antimicrobials that can specifically target specific groups of bacteria is of paramount importance.”

Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

The researchers note that their tests looked at only a subset of the factors that contribute to . More research, they say, will need to be done. But they are encouraged by their early results.

In a scientific paper outlining their findings, the researchers note that moving away from antibiotics that kill  indiscriminately to antibiotics that work more selectively would be an “important step forward” in the battle against the growing problem of . Despite increasing concerns about “superbugs” that no longer respond to existing antibiotics, there are few new antibiotics in the pipeline.

“Unbridled imagination and creativity have worked so well in advancing knowledge in so many medical disciplines – why not for antibiotics?” Hoffman asked. “The three big challenges to this end are, one, overcoming drug resistance; two, chemistries that limit drug metabolism and toxicity in humans and animals; and three, antibiotics that mitigate damage to the human microbiome. Maybe amixicile can teach us something useful about how to create the next generation of .”

The researchers have published their results in the Journal of Periodontology.

CreditsUniversity of Virginia

An A.I. distinguishes between biological males and females based on a smile

A new artificial intelligence system has found an accurate way of distinguishing between images of biological males and females — and all it needs to do is to take a quick look at their smile!

Developed by researchers at the U.K.’s University of Bradford, the system is based on a previously discovered insight that the facial muscles move differently when men and women flash a grin. By incorporating this into an image recognition system, the researchers were able to create an A.I. that is 86 percent accurate in distinguishing between the sexes.

“We have studied extensively how people smile, from video clips and with the help of the computer,” lead researcher Professor Hassan Ugail told Digital Trends. “From such detailed analysis, we are able to confirm that the smile of women and men are distinctly different. For example, females tend to have broader or wider smiles and their smiles tend to last longer.”

The algorithm works by analyzing 49 distinguishing features of the face, such as the way that the mouth, cheeks, and areas surrounding the eyes move when a person smiles. Once developed, it was tested on video footage of 109 people smiling to test efficacy.

“The technology can be used as part of a toolkit for person identification,” Ugail continued. “For example, police might want to identify a person from a blurry CCTV footage where the person in question is physically unrecognizable — say, from the facial features, color or the shape — but the facial emotions, such as the smile, may be somewhat clear. In such cases, knowing the person’s gender would immensely help the police to narrow down their search.”

Potentially far more useful than that is the suggestion that smiles may not just break down into male or female categories, but could actually be a unique biometric identity. If it turns out to be correct that each and every one of us smile slightly differently, it might be incorporated into a future Face ID-style biometrics security system which asks users to flash a quick grin in order to unlock their phone or other mobile device.

A paper describing the work was recently published in the journal The Visual Computer.

No more toothbrush! Here comes the smartbrush.

Smartrush is the fastest patented Oral Hygiene Device! Brush your teeth in just 3 seconds! it works with iPhone / Android. For Adults and kids. And it comes in a Smart mouthpiece that is claimed to reinvent the toothbrush, enables 3-second teeth cleaning.

The science fiction-like device is a mouthpiece boasting a large number of tiny brushes, alongside a micropump system which distributes toothpaste. Put it into your mouth and the idea is that it cleans every tooth simultaneously, saving you the indignity of having to move a toothbrush around your mouth to polish your pearly whites one at a time. You can even control the brush speed from your smartphone, via a connected app.

“In our opinion, in the toothbrush industry there has been no real innovation for decades,” inventor Nicola Nichele told Digital Trends. “If you think of electric toothbrushes, for example, you can easily realize that these are only slightly changed from time to time with different types of bristles or slightly different shapes, but there has never been real innovation in terms of time and advantages. We believe that in many areas there are big improvements we can make to make people’s lives easier. We hope this will be only the first of many innovative projects that will help all people to change their habits for the better.”

Once you’ve brushed your teeth with the Unico smartbrush, simply put it back into its dock and it will be automatically rid of bacteria using the cleaning powers of ultraviolet light. Fully recharged and restored, it will be ready for your next three-second clean. Or so it claims.

The concept looks all kinds of intriguing, but it may be worth waiting to see whether this one lives up to the hype before parting with your hard-earned cash. It is currently hoovering up funds on Kickstarter, however, where it has raised close to $960,000.

Clearly there is tremendous interest in the toothbrush evolution, but until there is proof that it can do the job better than our current trusted one, Let’s just keep on brushing ;))

 

Tell your “Ai Dentist” where it hurts

It was just matter of time before we need it to talk about your Ai Dentist 🙂

The metropolitan city of Vantaa is now offering an algorithm-driven assessment programme to help automate preliminary patient care. Developed by the Finnish company Klinik Healthcare Solutions, the programme is designed to recognise health conditions and deduce the degree of an ailment’s urgency.

“In acute situations, the programme’s AI suggests that customers contact emergency dental services immediately. The evaluation of the need for care is suspended at this point,” says Hanna-Mari Kommonen, an oral hygiene specialist. In less urgent cases, dental service personnel contact the customer on the next business day at the latest.

The service presents a series of questions that ask customers to describe their symptoms, and makes deductions about what kind of dental care is needed.

24/7 help for aching teeth

The goal is to speed up the evaluation process, as the electronic service would be available 24 hours a day. The new service is hoped to help ease up long waiting times for phone consultations and appointments. Additionally, after the virtual consultation, symptoms and complaints will be known to dental staff when employees contact the person to book an appointment.

The new service does not, however, direct the customer to immediately make an online appointment. Finnish law prevents this, stating that actual health professionals must be the ones who decide about what kind of appointments are necessary.

Depending on the urgency assessment, the programme also assists with patient flow management by suggesting that customers book a time, for example, in three days or three weeks.

Long-term plans for cost-cutting digitalisation

Vantaa has earlier introduced e-services to its health care services with a real-time chat service and a similar Klinik AI programme that has been in use at the Myyrmäki district health care centre since August.

“Vantaa is one of the first service providers in all of Finland to launch e-services so comprehensively, extending to oral hygiene as well,” says Kommonen.

There are plans in Vantaa to further develop the electronic booking services and even roll out remote dental consultations. This would entail oral hygienists making video contact with customers and the use of intraoral cameras.

“The idea is to increase the amount of self-service opportunities. This would mean we could cut down on the personnel we need. Current legislation prohibits us from downsizing our staff, but this service creates added value for our customers,” Kommonen says.

How about personal data safety? The developers, Klinik Healthcare Solutions, say the programme has been taken into use without issue in regional health care centres in Central Finland and the municipalities of Saarikka and Vesilahti – and now Vantaa.

“We use a one-way encryption method that doesn’t require any passwords or bank codes to log in. Analysis from our data security experts has established that the service is a safe place to operate,” says Kommonen.

For now however please call our office to tell us ‘where it hurts’.

World’s First Robotic Dental Implant

A robot dentist has carried out the first successful autonomous implant surgery by fitting two new teeth into a woman’s mouth, mainland media has reported.

A robot just implanted two 3D-printed teeth into a woman’s mouth all on its own. The procedure took place recently in China and the researchers who developed it hope it can help the country’s dentist shortage problem, reports the South China Morning Post.

Prior to the surgery, the robot was oriented to the patient’s head and mouth and researchers then programmed the device with all of the necessary information for it to complete the procedure. That included the angles and depth required for accurate placement of the implants. After testing the programmed movements, the operation was carried out. It took about an hour and though medical staff were present during the procedure, none of them assisted the robot while it worked. Afterwards, the staff determined that the robot had implanted the teeth with high precision.

Due to a dentist shortage, South China Morning Post reports that while around 400 million people need dental implants in the country, only about one million are done each year. Further, when people turn to less qualified individuals in order to get needed dental work done, they often end up with additional problems. Robots stand to increase service rates and complete operations with fewer errors.

Dentistry has increasingly enlisted the help of robotics, notes the Post, with robot usage increasingly common in orthodontic procedures and root canal surgeries, as well as in student training. Yomi, a robot system designed to assist dentists in dental implant procedures, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in March.
You can check out the video below for some shots of the robot in action.

 

Super tooth is here – developed UCSB Scientists

Fewer trips to visit with us may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank.

Inspired by the mechanisms mussels use to adhere to inhospitable surfaces, UC Santa Barbara researchers have developed a new type of dental composite that provides an extra layer of durability to treated teeth. The potential payoff? Longer lasting fillings, crowns, implants and other work.

“It’s as hard as a typical dental restoration but less likely to crack,” Kollbe Ahn, a materials scientist at UCSB’s Marine Science Institute, said of the composite. The research is highlighted in the journal Advanced Materials. The paper, of which Ahn is the corresponding author, is the result of collaboration between research and industry.

On average, a dental restoration lasts five to 10 or so years before needing replacement. The time frame depends on the type of restoration and how well the patient cares for the treated tooth. However, the continual onslaught of chewing, acidic and hard foods, poor hygiene, nighttime tooth grinding, generally weak teeth and even inadequate dental work can contribute to a filling’s early demise — and another expensive and possibly less-than-pleasant experience in the dental chair.

According to Ahn, one of the primary reasons restorations fall out or crack is brittle failure of the bond with the surrounding tooth. “All dental composites have micro-particles to increase their rigidity and prevent their shrinkage during their curing process,” he explained. “But there’s a trade-off: When the composite gets harder, it gets more brittle.”

With enough pressure or wear and tear, a crack forms, which then propagates throughout the entire restoration. Or, the gap between the tooth and the restoration results in restoration failures, including marginal tooth decay.

So Ahn and his colleagues looked to nature — mussels, to be exact — to find a way not only to maintain strength and hardness but also to add durability. Having perfected the art of adhering to irregular surfaces under the variable conditions of the intertidal zone — evolving to resist pounding waves, the blazing heat of the sun and cycles of salt water immersion and windy dryness — mussels presented the ideal model for more durable dental restoration materials. The byssal threads they use to affix to surfaces allow them to resist the forces that would tear them from their moorings.

“In nature, the soft collagenous core of the mussel’s byssal threads is protected by a 5-to-10 micrometer thick, hard coating, which is also extensible and thus, tough,” Ahn said. This durability and flexibility allow the mollusks to stick to wet mineral surfaces in harsh environments that involve repeated push-and-pull stress.

Key to this mechanism is what the scientists call dynamic or sacrificial bonding — multiple reversible and weak bonds on the sub-nanoscopic molecular level that can dissipate energy without compromising the overall adhesion and mechanical properties of the load-bearing material.

“Say you have one strong bond,” Ahn explained. “It may be strong but once it breaks, it breaks. If you have several weaker bonds, you would have to break them one by one.” Breaking each weak bond, he continued, would dissipate energy, so the overall energy required to break the material would be greater than with a single strong bond.

This type of bonding occurs in many biological systems, including animal bone and tooth. The mussel’s byssus contain a high number of unique chemical functional groups called catechols, which are used to prime and promote adhesion to wet mineral surfaces. The new study shows that using a catecholic coupling agent instead of the conventional silane coupling agent provides 10 times higher adhesion and a 50 percent increase in toughness compared to current dental restorative resin composites.

While research has proven this toughening mechanism in soft materials, this study is one of the first — if not the first — to prove it with rigid and load-bearing materials.

This proof-of-concept, which also demonstrates no cytotoxicity, could mean tougher, more durable dental fillings. And that, in the long run, could mean fewer dental visits. Because each replacement filling also requires the dentist to file the surrounding tooth to prime its surface, given enough replacements a tooth might need to be crowned or extracted; and if not replaced, the tooth loss could have adverse consequences for the individual’s diet and health.

The next step, Ahn said, is to increase the material’s durability even further.

“By changing the molecular design you could have even denser coupling agents that exist on the surface, and then we can have a stronger and more durable dental composite,” he said, estimating a commercial product within a couple of years.

Ahn credits the interdisciplinary research environment at UCSB for the development of the new load bearing polymer composites such as this dental restoration material. The project builds on the fundamental mussel-mimetic research that UCSB molecular biologist Herbert Waite conducted over several decades, which has been brought into collaboration with Jinsoo Ahn, a dentist from Seoul National University. This project also builds on the work of other UCSB researchers, including surface physicist Jacob Israelachvili’s expertise with surface interactions and forces; physical chemist Joan-Emma Shea’s simulations of how individual molecules adsorb to surfaces; and mechanical engineer Megan Valentine’s expertise in mechanical testing.

Source : UC Santa Barbara

Credit: STRN